Cocktails for a Cause
Oct
19
8:00 PM20:00

Cocktails for a Cause

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Supporting Indigenous Reforestation

Highland Support Project presents "Cocktails for a Cause" an event supporting Indigenous Women’s Reforestation Program in Latin America. Growing healthy forest and women’s enterprise! With live music by elliott ness!!

GET YOUR TICKETS HERE!!

A little background…

The Association of Highland Women's tree nursery is located in the community Espumpuja, Guatemala. It is a social enterprise that specializes in collecting seeds from the old-growth forests to preserve the genetic diversity in the regions tree stock. The enterprise provides women with business, leadership, and training opportunities that are not existant to rural indigenous women.

Why conserve forest genetic resources?
"The layperson might wonder why forest genetic resources are important," says the Panel's Secretary, Christel Palmberg-Lerche of FAO. "Isn't one type of fern or poplar pretty much like another?... And genetic variation within species is important because growth and resistance to stresses such as harsh weather and disease depend on such variation. Tree populations that are genetically uniform won't grow as well over the varying environments that forests occupy and will face more difficulty in evolving to cope with changing environments. Intensive breeding encourages uniformity, so a reservoir of new genes needs to be constantly available to meet new problems."

What is so bad about deforestation?

Forests are Earth’s lungs–they sequester carbon, release oxygen, and protect against global climate change. When we burn fossil fuels and clear trees, we release heat-trapping gases into the atmosphere.

In Guatemala, the situation is critical because much of the country is mountains. Entire villages have been buried under mudslides that are a result of the dramatic deforestation. Furthermore, water sources become contaminated, and valuable topsoil is lost due to the erosion of barren lands.

What has HSP done?

he Highland Support Project has supported reforestation efforts for over twenty-five years. In this time, we have learned that reforestation is not merely the act of planting a tree. Effective reforestation requires community organizing and education. Frequently, trees are cut down in a few years to provide firewood for inefficient open-air fire pits, or they never grow because someone has received a goat or cow and need the pastoral lands.

HSP responds to these complex problems by developing social enterprises that assist Indigenous people to live on their lands, in their communities, and with their culture. The tree nursery that HSP started in Espumpuja is one example. For over a decade, we have purchased hundreds of trees that provide jobs for community members, we have built thousands of fuel-efficient cookstoves that reduce the demand. We have engaged with primary school education and women's organizing to promote ecological sustainability.

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Oct
17
3:14 PM15:14

Maya Culture and the Counting of Time Lecture

Don Audelino Sac Coyo will share Maya knowledge of time and space in a lecture to prepare participants to participate in a Maya ceremony. The ceremony will take place from 4:30 to 6:00 p.m.

Audelino Sac Coyoy is a Maya-K’iche’ academic from Quetzaltenango, Guatemala.   He describes his duel life as a Maya "Day Counter" or "Maya Preist " in his native culture and as a Professor of Political Science and Maya Studies in his Western Persona.   

In addition to his notable academic career,  Don Audelino was selected by the council of elders to represent Maya communities in negotiations between the government and the revolutionary forces of the URNG.   He has consulted with numerous government and non-governmental agencies on development policies.  He is currently the advisor for HSP's maternal and infant well-being program.    

Don Aude is on a speaking tour sponsored by the Highland Support Project to schools that participate in our Partners in Service program.

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Dinner for Hope 2018
Apr
7
5:30 PM17:30

Dinner for Hope 2018

  • Fredericksburg United Methodist Church (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Help the Highland Support Project (HSP) change lives in indigenous communities in Guatemala, Ecuador, and Arizona. Every dollar raised goes to HSP’s grassroots and holistic approach to tackling the culture of dependency that has trapped many rural communities. 

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SERVANT LEADERSHIP IN PURSUIT OF THE DOUBLE BOTTOM LINE
Feb
13
6:00 PM18:00

SERVANT LEADERSHIP IN PURSUIT OF THE DOUBLE BOTTOM LINE

Defining Socal Intrapreneurship.  Leading Social Innovation in Organizations

Russ Gong of Deloitte and Ben Blevins from the Highland Support Project will be discussing challenges and opportunities in the corporate sector for creating social change programming.  

The dynamic duo will share their collaboration to provide Undergraduate students with international consulting through the delivery of transformational consulting services to indigenous NGO's, micro-enterprises and municipal governments. 

February 13, 6:00 PM to 7:30 PM.  Carole Weinstein International Center.  University of Richmond

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Indigenous Critique of Party Politics
Nov
14
12:00 PM12:00

Indigenous Critique of Party Politics

Audelino Sac Coyoy is a Maya-K’iche’ academic from Quetzaltenango, Guatemala.   He describes his duel life as a Maya "Day Counter" or "Maya Preist " in his native culture and as a Professor of Political Science and Maya Studies in his Western Persona.  

Don Audelino, as his students call him,  presents an indigenous alternative to party politics based on meritocracy and grass-roots respect over money or institutional control over the decision-making process.    Elections a democracy does not make when the process for selecting candidates is not democratic.  

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Weaving Tomorrow from Yesterday: Textile Production as a form of Resistance
Oct
24
7:00 PM19:00

Weaving Tomorrow from Yesterday: Textile Production as a form of Resistance

Paola Tzep Aju represents a new generation of Maya women born in traditional culture but embracing their roles in a globalized community.   Paola grew up weaving traditional ceremonial garments and utilitarian fabrics in her rural Highland village of Xeabaj Ixtehuacan.  
 

Paola with be speaking about her work to build resiliency in rural artisans to adapt to a changing world on their own terms.    

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Apache Women Speak: Water Rights & Indigenous Food Sovereignty
Oct
3
7:00 PM19:00

Apache Women Speak: Water Rights & Indigenous Food Sovereignty

 

Cheryl Pailzote, chief hydrologist of the White Mountain Apache Nation, and Robyn Pailzote, farm technician on the Nedée Bikíya horticulture, enterprise,  will lead us in a discussion about tribal water rights and food soverignty that native communities are doing to address these critical problems, and how you too can be a part of protecting natural life-giving resources and supporting indigenous efforts.

Come and hear these dynamic women talk about their efforts to restore water and food sovereignty amongst the White Mountain Apache.

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Cocina de la Abuela
Sep
21
12:00 PM12:00

Cocina de la Abuela

Indigenous food sovereignty lunch is featuring easy to make at home recipes from grandma's kitchen.  Join us for a meal and discussion concerning food systems with Indigenous peoples of the Americas.   Decolonize your mind, body and spirt with whole food

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Cross-Cultural Training Workshop for Faith based groups working with Native communities
Mar
19
1:00 PM13:00

Cross-Cultural Training Workshop for Faith based groups working with Native communities

Native American Ministries Training

The Highland Support Project (HSP) is providing a training for cross-cultural competency with Native American communities. Topics covered will include context of ministry, best practices, cultural norms and values. 

The workshops are three hours, dynamic and participatory. Mission leaders, youth workers, volun-teers or anyone interested in working with Native populations, register today for this amazing one-day Seminar presented by Rochelle J. Lacapa, MPH is the workshop presenter. Ms. Lacapa is a member of the White Mountain Apache Tribe and holds a degree in theology from Notre Dame and a Master of Public Health from Johns Hopkins. Ms. Lacapa was director of Johns Hopkins Center for American Indi-an Health on the White Mountain Apache reservation. She is currently program manager for Method-ist supported project through the Highland Support Project. 

March 17th, 6:00 p.m. – 9 p.m., Pace Campus Ministry Center. 700 W. Franklyn St., Richmond 

March 18th, 9:00 a.m.- 1:00 p.m., Fredericksburg UMC 308 Hanover St. Fredericksburg 

March 19th, 1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m., Aldersgate UMC, 1301 Collingwood Rd. Alexandria 

The event is free. Please register at www.highlandsupportproject.org/nat. or contact ben@highlandpartners.org 

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