Creating Opportunities for Guatemalan Children

A quality education opens up a child's mind to a world of ideas. In the best instances, an exceptional education also opens up their hearts to other people in the world. 

An example of this exceptional education is our partnership with the Flint Hill in Oaktown Virginia and the elementary school Twi'Ninwitz in La Cumbre, Guatemala. 

Flint Hill is an educational institution that seeks to cultivate civic leadership and global citizenship amongst the young people privileged to attend an elite school. Their commitment to ensuring that students develop creative and critical thinking skills extend beyond their walls.

For the last six years, Flint Hill has traveled to rural Guatemala to support our Maya arts program and clean stove initiative to ensure that the next generation of Highland Maya is able to take advantage of opportunities and transform our world for the better. 

In July 2017, donated 15 computers and funding for teacher training to Twi’Ninwitz the Public School at La Cumbre to equip a computer lab that was constructed. 

After almost a year we are very happy and thankful because the education was improved and now the kids have computer skills before graduated from sixth grade. 

Last summer Flint Hill team was hard working at the school building a wall that makes the school safer for the 104 kids that attend there. While they were here they made some activities with the kids like making bracelets, teach them English, make bubbles and play soccer. On their last day, they planted 300 trees around the community.

Thanks to Flint Hill, Twi'Ninwitz is the first school equipped with new computers in Quetzaltenango, San Juan Ostuncalco and has been a successful project. We want to keep improving the education in the different communities where AMA works and start different programs to teach them how important is to go every day to school and how can they make changes in their families and communities if they work improving their education every day.

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Diana Alvarado